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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it takes a whole mix of people whether it's the department of defense and even fema having roles to play in that. bob fenton, the assistant chief of fema, used to be the division chief in division 9. he is no stranger to this area, born and raised here, this is his home and so he does have a care and an interest in this community and beyond. and so with that it is hard to fill being his replacement at the regional level because not only to fill his shoes all the great work he did in this region, but also because when you see the size difference, it's a little hard to fit in there. but this this i want to introduce bob fenton, the response head for fema coming in from dc to help support this and moderate the panel. thank you. (applause). >> well, appreciate it. appreciate the opportunity to be back with friends and back in san francisco. and i appreciate the opportunity to be your lunch speaker. as i always say, lunch is one of may five most important meals of the day so thank you for that. let me introduce my panelists. here to my left, we have a great group here to talk about stor
with the city. fema is well represented and we have several defense coordinating officers here over the past couple of days. certainly the california national guard is represented heavily here. obviously they are going to be the first guys to respond to a disaster and they have several interesting roles not only from a state perspective but as they get federalized or with the dual status commander managing federal response and federal authorities of military authorities flowing in. and most significantly, we're represented today with the commander of northern command, general jackoby. as you know, defense report to civil authorities is not a primary mission area for the department of defense. we have codified it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and ver
a perspective of fema, we not only have a defense officer appointed by dod embedded with us during a disaster but we actually practice and have communications interoperatability over our systems to be sure we can communicate with each other on similar platforms and also support state and local platforms, whether it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications.
, a small subcommittee, has been working on putting together a grant application for a fema innovation challenge award which is about $35,000 to do a small innovative project. after long deliberation we decided to work on a disaster preparedness initiative for sro owners -- for sro tenants. these, as you know, are some of the most challenging populations who have traditionally been ostracized or kept away from the typical disaster preparedness can urricula. our project is proposing to develop an innovate i've can you remember rim klupl using collectives and community organizers to get folks, around 300 residents, to develop a structure for developing culturally appropriate disaster can urriculum. we believe very strongly this is a project worthy of funding and possible to create some important work and important precedent and we'll keep you updated. i also would like to remind everybody that our next disability disaster preparedness meeting that's open to the public is on november 2nd, so the first friday of november, and it will be in room 421 of city hall from 1.30 to 3.30 pm mra
a pretty robust training plan in preparation for this. we did the fema online course, eoc course at nasne, hadr course, trained with cal fire, take the time to take that training. it's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be p
operations center and then supporting whatever the fema initiatives are moving out from that in cross-discipline lines. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> as an operator of a distribution system, the stories are probably very similar. we have small emergencies every day, small, medium and even large, so the back-up systems, the screening, the ics structure, the spare parts, the communication, those muscles are flexed quite often. the big one is the one we design for and spend a lot of our time and energy preparing for. the big one for us is the design earthquake, it's the max credible earthquake, san an drais a is basically a 8.0, a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. some of the components can be tested, we can simulate an earthquake on some of these facilities as they are in design to make sure they can withdraw that level of earthquake. we're designing for an 8.0 and that's not what happened in japan in 2011. the earthquake that hit japan in 2011 was not what they were designing for and all the assumptions went out the window so that's food for thought. >> thank you. mr. angelus. >> at ve
, the national guard, with our federal partners fema, the national park service, and with all of our military partners to, you know, really work on being prepared and ready for anything in the bay area region. and i'm confident that with the relationships we're building, that we will be prepared when the time comes. thank you. >> thank you to the panel for all of their insights. (applause) >> big hand for the panel, that was great. and if i could ask the panel to stay where you are, jody, if you would sit down. i want to bring the closing remarks, i want to bring up former secretary of state george schultz. >> for closing remarks, want to bring up secretary of state george schultz. if you could help on this end. >> that was a great panel. thank you all. >> well, we've had quite a display. we've had a lot of area planning, filled with op exercises. we had the ocean beach yesterday. the military made something difficult look easy. it was a display of competence. and it gives us confidence that not only is the military going to help us if we have a problem here, but the military is able to do it
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)